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John Sinclair – “Mohawk” CD

John Sinclair; 'Mohawk'John Sinclair – “Mohawk” CD

Download MOHAWK <<

John Sinclair, the renegade poet, scholar and cultural revolutionary released his new album.. John Sinclair has been described as an archetype of the 1960′s art, music and literary synthesis. Today John is still kicking with both feet on his trajectory for cultural transformation. His new record features ten tracks from his book of verse: always know: a book of monk. Twenty poems planted firmly in a single-shot session, and carefully trimmed down to ten exhibits for this album. Beatnik poems, great odes and personal reflections of the Be-Bop jazz persuasion, all flowering together.

Read more: John Sinclair – “Mohawk” CD
 
FREE THE WEED 49
Written by John Sinclair   
Wednesday, 01 April 2015 17:46

FREE THE WEED 49

A Column by John Sinclair

For the past several months in this column I’ve been presenting excerpts from my book called It’s All Good: A John Sinclair Reader, soon to be issued by the publishers of this magazine. In fact, I’m in New Orleans right now working with my daughter Celia on designing and producing the book for publication this spring. This month’s offering—in honor of his birthday on March 12—is an edited version of my assessment of the great American poet and writer from Lowell, Massachusetts who started it all.

THE PROPHESY OF JACK KEROUAC

America after World War II was well on its way to becoming the kind of ugly, spiritually desolate world it is today. The dehumanization of American civilization began in earnest when they dropped Fat Man and Little Boy on the people of Japan and flew smugly away, back to the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave.

The mental and moral landscape of America was flattened and irradiated like Hiroshima and Nagasaki when the Americans dropped their atomic bombs on human beings in Japan, and the fabric of American life would remain terminally warped forever after.

After the bomb began the homogenization and commodification of our culture and the establishment of the endless networks of suburban modules to house the white people outside the limits of our nation’s cities.

Here too began the rigid economic stratification of our society into the tripartite reality of modern America—the rich get richer, the people who are allowed to work for them prosper in suburban bliss, and the uneducated, racially segregated underclass is left to wage a bitter struggle for simple survival in the vast urban ghettos that remain as the ruins of our great industrial centers.

But after the war small pockets of resistance gathered and stood bravely against the raging tide of conformism and conspicuous consumption that swept over post-war America—tiny clumps of intellectuals both street-level and academic, including a handful of inspired writers determined to chronicle the joys of modern life as well as measure the relentless disintegration of the nation’s human and emotional resources during this ghastly period of decline.

The greatest of these writers was Jack Kerouac, a literary prophet who illuminated post-war America with his epic tales of ecstatic and complicated life outside the narrowing cultural mainstream. Jack Kerouac left our humble planet for places unknown on October 21, 1969 at the age of 47.

That day also marked the 52nd birthday of John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie, genius of modern jazz, born in 1917. Kerouac’s birthdate, March 12 (1922), coincides with the death of the great Charlie Parker, one of Jack’s idols and prime artistic influences, on March 12, 1955 at the age of 34.

It is not at all strange that these three contemporaries, born within a five-year period, should be linked by their vital dates on the great wheel of karma. Together they forged a complete revolution in the sound of modern music and prosody.

Kerouac was an habitue of the after-hours sessions at Minton’s Playhouse and Clark Monroe’s Uptown House in Harlem, where he heard Monk, Bird, Dizzy, Max Roach and other young jazzmen wrestle nightly with moving the music to a higher level of complexity, intellection and rhythmic thrust.

Kerouac spent the rest of the ’40s trying to infuse his own writing with the wild methodology of bebop, finally succeeding in 1951-52 with Visions of Cody, On The Road and Dr. Sax.

He attacked narrative writing as an exercise in epic poetic composition driven by the imperatives of an inspired bebop saxophonist—to make it happen, say something and make it swing.

Bird and Dizzy and Monk are playing inside Kerouac’s ears as he writes: Sometimes he’s a tenor saxophone, other times he’s the singer, then again he might be the drummer whacking and boomping away beneath the horns.

But the music is always there, in the writing, and all around it, defining it, all ways, always there.

“You guys call yourselves poets, write little short lines, I’m a poet but I write lines paragraphs and pages and many pages long,” the bard insisted in a letter to Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder and Philip Whalen in the mid-’50s.

Or, to Donald Allen in 1959: “Let there be no equivocation about statement, and if you think this is not hard to do, try it.”

Let there be no equivocation about statement. Say something, brother man, and make it swing. If you think this is not hard to do, try it. Bird made it sound so easy, but you can hear hundreds of players every night, 60 years later, all over the world, still trying to get inside of Bird’s sound.

Kerouac’s brilliant series of novels—On The Road, Dharma Bums, The Subterraneans, Visions of Cody—detailed the exploits of “the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars….”

Blasted on marijuana, benzedrine or cheap wine, Kerouac sat at his typewriter and captured the spirit and frenzy of the “mad ones” he encountered between the early years of the war and the end of the 1950s, the “mad ones” and the improbable lives they devised for themselves in a sort of jazz and dope and poetry underworld of their own fabrication—an underworld that maintained a precarious existence on the cutting edge of urban civilization, living outside the law in the rotted underbelly of the beast, feeding on the excess produce of the hostile world of commerce around them and transforming this purloined energy into magnificent works of personal expression in music, dance, painting, poetry and prose.

On The Road, Kerouac’s best-known work, written in one continuous burst of creative energy in 1952 but not published until 1957, chronicled the beginnings of what’s come to be known as the Beat Generation during its formative years just after the war.

“Once started,” William Burroughs pointed out, “the Beat movement had a momentum of its own and a world-wide impact. In fact, the intelligent conservatives in America saw this as a serious threat to their position long before the Beat writers saw it themselves. A much more serious threat, say, than the Communist Party.

“The Beat literary movement came at exactly the right time and said something that millions of people of all nationalities all over the world were waiting to hear.....There’s no doubt that we’re living in a freer America as a result of the Beat literary movement.”

The great Kerouac persona has relentlessly been reduced over the years to the well-known caricature of the graceless drunken beatnik lout. Bullshit! Kerouac, my friends, was full of grace, and a “great creator of forms that ultimately find expression in mores and what have you.”

This was what Charlie Parker said when he played:

‘All Is Well.’ You had the feeling

of early in the morning,

like a hermit’s joy, or like the perfect cry

of some wild gang

at a jam session—

Wail! Wop!

Yes, All is Well. Or like the end of the Blues and Haikus session, when producer Bob Thiele asks Kerouac if he can get home okay. “Yeah,” Jack says. “We got a car.”

“Oh, good.”

—New Orleans

March 15, 2015

© 2015 John Sinclair. All Rights Reserved.

 
2015—04 April Program Guide
Written by John Sinclair   
Wednesday, 01 April 2015 17:23

 

The John Sinclair Foundation Presents

RADIO FREE AMSTERDAM 2015

BLUES, JAZZ & REEFER—KEEPING THE MUSIC ALIVE

Mondays

The John Sinclair Radio Show

plus The Soul Lucille Show with Lucille DJ en Italiano

Tuesdays

The Blues Show with Bruce Pingree

Wednesdays

Chicago Bound plus Messin’ With The Blues with Leslie Keros

Thursdays

Blues From the Red Rooster Lounge with Cary Wolfson

Fridays

Beyond The Groove Yard with George Klein

plus Fly By Night with Steve The Fly

Saturdays

Diggin’ The Roots with Tom Morgan

plus Highway 61 Blues with Scott Barretta

Sundays

Jazz From The Hempshopper with John Sinclair

plus Jazz Lunatique with David Kunian

*

Our April program schedule features some scintillating programs from Steve The Fly, more lunacy from David Kunian, classic modern jazz from our Hempshopper archives, classic blues from Scott Barretta at Mississippi Public Radio, soul music & funk en Italiano from Lucille DJ in Florence, Italy, and more of the music you’ve come to expect from Tom Morgan, Leslie Keros, George Klein, Cary Wolfson and Bruce Pingree.

All Radio Free Amsterdam programs are archived at our site under the name of each show. Once a program has been posted you can look it up and play it at any time. Punch LISTEN NOW to hear our program stream.

*


APRIL 2015 PROGRAM GUIDE

Wednesday, April 1

BLOW WIND BLOW

CHICAGO BOUND 37

Leslie Keros is blowing in from Chicago with a stellar program of music from the Windy City by Mud Morganfield & Kim Wilson, Muddy Waters, James Cotton, Magic Slim & the Teardrops, Willie Buck, Buddy Guy, the Jimmy Rogers All-Stars, and Freddie King.

MERCY, MERCY

MESSIN’ WITH THE BLUES 36

Leslie Keros pays homage to the recently departed Don Covay wih some of his finest recordings and versions of his compositions by The Rolling Stones and Aretha Franklin, plus cuts by the Chris Cain Band, James “Thunderbird” Davis, Little Johnny Taylor, Jay McShann with Jimmy Witherspoon, Big John Hamilton, Billy Butler, Stanley Turrentine, and Gregory Porter.

Thursday, April 2

POWER OF LOVE

RED ROOSTER LOUNGE 141

Cary Wolfson is spinning at the Red Rooster Lounge with great blues sides by Jimmie Vaughan with Louann Barton, James Harman, Shuggie Otis, Two Bones & A Pick, Jimmy Nolen, Floyd Dixon & Johnny “Guitar” Watson, Troyce Key with Eddie Cochran, D.A. Foster, Bobby “Blue” Bland, James Wheeler, and Big Chief Bo Dollis.

Friday, April 3

SERMONETTE

BEYOND THE GROOVE YARD 14

George Klein has another fine hour of spiritual & gospel jazz this week with selections by Johnny Griffin, Hampton Hawes, Nat Adderley, Lambert Hendricks & Ross, Ray Bryant, Oscar Peterson, Carla Bley, Charles Mingus, Eric Reed, Jimmy Smith, and Stanley Turrentine.

EASTER RAZBITS

FLY BY NIGHT 99

Steve The Fly is rising to the occasion of the Easter season with Episode 99 and playing music by Alice Coltrane, Mulatu Astatke, Yusef Lateef, Salah Ragab, Sun Ra & Hi Arkestra, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Thelonious Monk, Trilok Gurtu, and Lenny Bruce.

Saturday, April 4

WALK RIGHT IN

DIGGIN’ THE ROOTS 14

Tom Morgan is Diggin’ The Roots from the African American jug band tradition in Episode 14 featuring tunes by Cannon's Jug Stompers, the Memphis Jug Band, Phillips' Louisville Jug Band, Clifford Hayes, and the Last Chance Jug Band.

SHAKE ’EM ON DOWN

HIGHWAY 61 BLUES 40

Scott Barretta is featuring music this week from North Mississippi Hill Country blues artists, with Mississippi Fred McDowell, R.L. Burnside, Junior Kimbrough & the Soul Blues Boys, David Kimbrough, Duane Burnside, Sharde Thomas & the Rising Star Fife & Drum Band, Afrissippi, T-Model Ford, Robert “Wolfman” Balfour, Kenny Brown, Alvin “Youngblood” Hart, and Bobby Rush—much of it recorded at the North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic at Potts Camp outside of Oxford, Mississippi.

Sunday, April 5

LET'S CALL THIS

JAZZ FROM THE HEMPSHOPPER 06

John Sinclair plays modern jazz at the Hempshopper on a Friday afternoon in 2008 with music by Charlie Parker, Sun Ra & His Arkestra, Thelonious Monk, Kenny "Pancho" Hagood with the Dizzy Gillespie Orchestra, Oliver Nelson, the John Coltrane Quartet, the Lyman Woodard Organization, James Brown, the Miles Davis Quintet, and Billie Holiday.


THE WIZARD

JAZZ LUNATIQUE 14

David Kunian is reaching deep into the kitchen sink for a program of widely various selections from Egg Yolk Jubilee, Pete Townsend, Marc Ribot Trio, Wayne Kramer & the Lexington Art Ensemble, Paul Sanchez, Ruby Ray Watson, Les Lee, Leila McCalla, the Memphis Jug Band, Aurora Neale & the Royal Roses, Shotgun Jazz Band, Lou Reed, Walter “Wolfman” Washington, and the Treme Brass Band.

Monday, April 6

WHO KNOWS

JOHN SINCLAIR RADIO SHOW 595

Episode 595 will be emanating from the Hash Bash and Monroe Street Music & Art Fair in Ann Arbor with music yet to be selected.

BROADWAY FREEZE

THE SOUL LUCILLE SHOW 14

Lucille DJ is on the air from the heart of Italy with a killer hour of soul & super heavy funk with tunes by Aretha Franklin, Margie Hendricks, 100% Pure Poison, Betty Harris, Billy Paul, Earnest Jackson, Eldridge Holmes, the Fatback Band, Gary Bartz, Harvey Scales, John Schroeder, Cody Black, The Pharaohs, and Vernon Garrett.

Tuesday, April 7

JUNCO PARTNER

THE BLUES SHOW 174

Bruce Pingree is playing music in Episode 174 by Angela Strehli and Dr. John in honor of their respective November birthdays.

Wednesday, April 8

COUNTRY BOY

CHICAGO BOUND 38

Leslie Keros is celebrating the 101st anniversary of Muddy Waters’ birthday in Episode 38 with a selection of Muddy’s greatest recordings, an interview with Alan Lomax in 1942, and a cut by Muddy’s mentor, the great Son House.

SATURDAY NIGHT RUB

MESSIN’ WITH THE BLUES 37

Leslie Keros is messin’ with the blues in Episode 37, playing music by Jim Liban with the Joel Paterson Trio, Gregg Allman, Smokey Wilson & the William Clarke Band, Arthur Migliazza, Anson Funderburgh & The Rockets, David “Fathead” Newman, Robert Cray, Ann Rabson, Sil Austin, Harrison Kennedy, Dave Alvin & Phil Alvin, Guy King, and Billie Holiday.

Thursday, April 9

DRIVING WHEEL

RED ROOSTER LOUNGE 142

Cary Wolfson is spinning at the Red Rooster Lounge with great blues sides by Chuck Berry,Sonny Terry-Brownie McGhee-Lightnin’ Hopkins-Big Joe Williams, Etta Baker & Taj Mahal, Michael Jerome Browne, Eleanor Ellis, Paul Geremia, Ollabelle, Slam Allen, Charles Mingus, Johnny “Guitar” Watson, Roosevelt Sykes, Maurice John Vaughn, and Stanley Milton’s Mean Streak.

Friday, April 10

AMEN

BEYOND THE GROOVE YARD 15

George Klein is working in a gospel and spiritual vein this week with a program of soulful selections from Oliver Nelson, Eric Dolphy, Bobby Timmons, Charles Mingus, Milt Jackson, Ray Charles, Ray Brown, Marion Williams, Donald Byrd, Fred Jackson, Les McCann, and Gene Harris.

ALL EDDIE JEFFERSON

FLY BY NIGHT 100

Steve The Fly is playing all Eddie Jefferson in Episode 100 including both well-known and obscure selectiions from the early 1950s into the ‘60s and ‘70s.

Saturday, April 11

FIDGETY FEET

DIGGIN’ THE ROOTS 15

Tom Morgan is Diggin’ The Roots of the African American string band tradition in Episode 15 with tunes by Butch Cage & Willie B. Thomas, A Warren County String Band, Frank Amacker, King Bennie, Charlie And Sou, the Six And Seven-Eights String Band Of New Orleans, and the Storyville Stringband of New Orleans.

BOOGIE CHILLEN

HIGHWAY 61 BLUES 41

Highway 61 takes us to Clarksdale, Mississippi, Detroit, Michigan and Oakland, California in Episode 41 to investigate the works of the great John Lee Hooker from the late 1940s to the 1990s with commentary by Scott Barretta.

Sunday, April 12

BLUES CONNOTATION

JAZZ FROM THE HEMPSHOPPER 07

Another thrilling Friday night at the Hempshopper on the Singel canal in Amsterdam with John Sinclair and recordings by Charlie Parker, Ornette Coleman, Charles Mingus, Yusef Lateef, Miles Davis with the Gil Evans Orchestra, the Lyman Woodard Organization, Thelonious Monk, Red Garland, the John Coltrane Quartet, Roland Kirk, and Sun Ra & His Solar Myth Arkestra with our closing theme.

DRAMA

JAZZ LUNATIQUE 15

David Kunian is celebrating Mardi Gras with his annual Mardi Gras Indian Music Show featuring Egg Yolk Jubilee, the Wild Magnolias, Wild Tchoupitoulas, Golden Eagles, Ernest Skipper & Fi Yi Yi, The 79ers Gang, Marise DeJean with a conversation with Big Queen Mercedes Stevenson of the Wild Tchoupitoulas, Big Chief Peppy & Trombone Shorty, Big Chief Juan Pardo & the Golden Comanches, and Big Chief Roddy of the Black Eagles wih the Indians of the Nation.

Monday, April 13

WHAT IT IS

JOHN SINCLAIR RADIO SHOW 596

Episode 596 will be coming from an as yet unselected location in the Detroit Metropolitan Area with the sort of program of music and commentary you’ve come to expect from this show.

BLOW YOUR WHISTLE

THE SOUL LUCILLE SHOW 15

Lucille DJ is back on the air from the heart of Italy with another killer hour of soul & super heavy funk with tunes by Betty Everett, Candi Staton, Isley Brothers, Black Sugar, Screamin' Jay Hawkins, Chuck Brown & The Soul Searchers, Clarence Reid, Fred & The New JB's, Herbie Hancock, James Carr, Renaldo Domino, The Kaldirons, The Contours, and Labi Siffre.

Tuesday, April 14

EMERGENCY BOOGIE

THE BLUES SHOW 175

Bruce Pingree is playing music by harmonicist Jerry Portnoy and British blues giant John Mayall in honor of theoir respective birthdays.

Wednesday, April 15

TOUCH THE HEM OF HIS GARMENT

CHICAGO BOUND 39

Leslie Keros takes the blues to church in Episode 39 with musical contributions by Kendrick M. Jackson, Otis Clay, Michael Bloomfield, Muddy Waters, Jesse Fortune & Willie Dixon, Big Joe Williams, Mahalia Jackson, Sam Cooke & the Soul Stirrers, Cicero Blake, Eddie Robinson, Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Marie Knight, Erwin Helfer, Eric Noden, J.B. Lenoir, and Mavis Staples.

SUNNY ROAD

MESSIN WITH THE BLUES 38

Leslie Keros is taking the sunny road to the blues in Episode 38 with cuts by W.C. Clark, Roy Gaines, Lou Ann Barton, B.B. King, Memphis Slim & Matt “Guitar” Murphy, Aretha Franklin, Little Milton, Josh White, Bill Jennings & Willis “Gator” Jackson, the Mannish Boys, Clarence Brewer, Willie Tee, Kenny Neal & Billy Branch, and Dr. John.

Thursday, April 16

READ ME MY RIGHTS

RED ROOSTER LOUNGE 143

Cary Wolfson is spinning at the Red Rooster Lounge with great blues sides by the Phantom Blues Band, Angela Streghli-Marcia Ball-LuAnn Barton, Tabby Thomas, Lucky Peterson, Sister Monica Parker, King Biscuit Boy, Matthew Robinson, Sue Foley, Don Preston, Magic Sam, Johnny Winter, Steve Earl & The Dukes, and the James Solberg Band.

Friday, April 17

OLD GOSPEL

BEYOND THE GROOVE YARD 16

George Klein has more from the spiritual side this week with spiritual & gospel jazz by Grant Green, Irma Thomas, Jackie McLean, the Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Martha Bass & Fontella Bass, Thelonious Monk, Carla Bley, Rufus Harley, Nina Simone, and Slide Hampton.

LADY BIRD

FLY BY NIGHT 101

Steve The Fly is making jazz sing in Episode 101 with selections by Mary Lou Williams, Eddie Jefferson, Joe Carroll, and Annie Ross.

Saturday, April 18

WHOOPING BLUES

DIGGIN’ THE ROOTS 16

Tom Morgan is Diggin’ The Roots in Episode 17 for Radio Free Amsterdam featuring music from the Eureka Brass Band recorded in 1962 and the Young Tuxedo Brass Band from 1958, all on Atlantic Records.

GUITAR MAMBO

HIGHWAY 61 BLUES 42

Scott Barretta looks into the recording career of guitarist McHouston Baker, better known as Mickey, featuring sides as Big Red McHouston, Mickey “Guitar” Baker, and Mickey & Sylvia, and dates with Dick Dale, Sam Price, Brownie McGhee, Champion Jack Dupree, Louis Jordan, the Bill Hendricks Orchestra, Young Jesse, Roy “Mr. Guitar” Gaines, Titus Turner, Little Willie John, Charles Calhoun, Big John Greer, Mr. Bear & His Bear Cats, Square Walton, and Joe Clay.

Sunday, April 19

TENOR MADNESS

JAZZ FROM THE HEMPSHOPPER 08

Classic modern jazz from the Hempshopper in Amsterdam on a Friday evening in 2008 with John Sinclair spinning tunes by Charlie Parker, Sonny Rollins & John Coltrane, Sun Ra & His Arkestra, Thelonious Monk, the John Coltrane Quartet, and the Miles Davis Quintet.

Sunday, April 19

EARLY IN THE MORNING

JAZZ LUNATIQUE 16

David Kunian is honoring the Wild Indians of Mardi Gras with music by Big Chief Roddy & Indians of the Nation, a Mardi Gras Music Profile with Big Chief Bo Dollis, the Wild Tchoupitoulas, a gang of Wild Indians recorded in 1956, the Wild Magnolias & Willie Tee, Big Chief Black Feather & the Rebirth Brass Band, and the 101 Runners.

Monday, April 20

HOW HIGH YA GET

JOHN SINCLAIR RADIO SHOW 597

Back in Detroit for Episode 597 with music from the Motor City and wherever our minds might want to wander.

Monday, April 20

SHIFTING GEARS

THE SOUL LUCILLE SHOW 16

Lucille DJ is on the air from the heart of Italy with a killer hour of soul & super heavy funk with tunes by The O'Jays, The Staple Singers, Ann Alford, Bettye Swann, Eddie Kirk, Eddie Simpson, Eve Barnum, Ice, Johnny Hammond, M.I.S.T., The Nu People, Tonistics, and Fenton Robinson..

Tuesday, April 21

WE’LL NEVER TURN BACK

THE BLUES SHOW 176

Bruce Pingree is observing the 50th anniversary of the bridge crossing on Bloody Sunday 1965 in Selma, Alabama with music by the SNCC Singers, Fontella Bass, Odetta, Jane Sapp, Mavis Staples, Sweet Honey In The Rock, Staples Singers, Blind Boys of Alabama, Rance Allen Group, Carlton Reese & the Birmingham Movement Choir, Rev. Martin Luther King, and also International Women’s Day with songs from Etta James, Jeannie Carroll with Mr. B, Sippie Wallace, Precious Bryant, Eljah Mae Hinton, and Ma Rainey.

Wednesday, April 22

WHEN I FEEL BETTER

CHICAGO BOUND 40

Leslie Keros is Chicago bound in Episode 40 with great music by Willie Hudson, Eddie C. Campbell, Byther Smith, Little Walter Benton, Hubert Sumlin, Carl Weathersby, Charles Wilson, Charlie Musselwhite, Erwin Helfer, Lee “Shot” Williams, Steve Freund, and Henry Gray.

THE IN CROWD

MESSIN’ WITH THE BLUES 39

Leslie Keros checks in with Episode 39 with a nod to the late trumpet giant Clark Terry with music by Chris Foreman, Harrison Kennedy, Gregory Porter, Clark Terry, Oscar Peterson, Hank Crawford, Dan Moretti & The Hammond Boys, Freddy Cole, Mighty Sam McClain, and the Hollywood Blue Flames.

Thursday, April 23

HEY HEY BABY

RED ROOSTER LOUNGE 144

Cary Wolfson is spinning at the Red Rooster Lounge with great blues sides by Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Snooky Pryor, Mark Hummel, LaVelle White, Don Preston, Kirk Fletcher, Lurrie Bell, H-Bomb Ferguson, Hash Brown & Friends, Teeny Tucker, Lloyd Jones, Earl Hooker, Matthew Robinson, and Shuggie Otis.

Friday, April 24

TRUE BLUE

BEYOND THE GROOVE YARD 17

George Klein is sharing the Groove Yard focus in Episode 17 with tenor saxophonist Booker Ervin and a gang of soulful jazz pianists: Ray Bryant, Les McCann, Roy Haynes, and Hampton Hawes.

THIS IS HOW I FEEL

FLY BY NIGHT 102

Steve The Fly mounts an extended salture to Thelonious Monk the composer in Episode 102 with versions by Dr John, Bobby McFerrin, Was (Not Was), Steve Slagle-Dr John-Ed Blackwell, Bill Evans-Steve Lacy, Johnny Griffin & Carla Bley, Elvin Jones-Steve Lacy, Charlie Rouse-Steve Lacy, Randy Weston, Mark Bingham, Sharon Freeman, Joe Jackson, and Steve Lacy himself, with a closing number by Annie Ross.

Saturday, April 25

GOTTA SWEAT

DIGGIN’ THE ROOTS 17

Tom Morgan is Diggin’ The Roots in Episode 17 for Radio Free Amsterdam featuring brass band music from New Orleans by the Mahogany Brass Band, New Birth Brass Band, Rebirth Brass Band, the Storyville Stompers, Stooges Brass Band, Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Coolbone Brass Band, the Treme Brass Band, and the Olympia Brass Band.

MAXWELL STREET MARKET

HIGHWAY 61 BLUES 43

Highway 61 takes us to Chicago this week, to the Maxwell Street Market that was a blues center for years, now torn down but well documented in a film called And This Is Free in 1964, with Maxwell Street Market performances by Robert Nighthawk, Big Mojo Elem, Carey Bell, Big John Wrencher, Johnny Young, Arvella Gray, Blind James Brewer, and Fanny Brewer.

Sunday, April 26

HORNIN' IN

JAZZ FROM THE HEMPSHOPPER 09

An hour of splendid modern jazz from the Hempshopper on the Singel canal in Amsterdam on a Friday evening in 2008 with John Sinclair playing music by Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, Oliver Nelson, Miles Davis with the Gil Evans Orchstra, Miles Davis & John Coltrane, Yusef Lateef, Sonny Rollins, the Lyman Woodard Organization, the John Coltrane Quartet, the Count Basie Orchestra, and Sun Ra & His Solar Myth Arkestra.

BIRTHDAY

JAZZ LUNATIQUE 17

David Kunian is clebrating his birthday tonight with a program of music by Egg Yolk Jubilee, The Beatles, Earl King, Pixie, Howling Wolf, Archie Shepp, Vijay Ayer Trio, Pharoah Sanders, Fela Kuti, Either Orchestra, and Muddy Waters.

Monday, April 27

CHICAGO BOUND

JOHN SINCLAIR RADIO SHOW 598

Episode 598 will find us in Chicago for the opening of Sergio Mayora’s art show playing music from the Windy City and whatever else we might feel like playing.

FUNKY CHICK

THE SOUL LUCILLE SHOW 17

Lucille DJ is on the air from the heart of Italy with a killer hour of soul & super heavy funk with tunes by Robert Parker, Eddie Bo, Just Brothers, Hal Singer, Jo Ann Garrett, Judy Clay, Leo Muller, Marie “Queenie“ Lyons, Pleasure Web, Alder Ray Black, Reuben Bell, Grover Washington Jr., Stu Gardner, The Majestics, The Soul Children, and Hank Crawford.

Tuesday, April 28

MOANIN’ THE BLUES

THE BLUES SHOW 177

Bruce Pingree is playing the blues for International Women’s Day with contributions from Lucille Hegeman, Lizzie Miles, Lil Green, Ethel Waters, Victoria Spivey, Memphis Minnie, Alberta Hunter, Ida Cox, Big Mama Thornton & Fred McDowell, Erin Harp, Fiona Boyds, Carolyn Wonderland, Maria Muldaur & Bonnie Raitt, and Rory Block, and cuts by Richard “Rabbit” Brown, Bob Brosman, and Robert “Wolfman” Balfour.

Wednesday, April 29

SHAKE YOUR BOOGIE

CHICAGO BOUND 41

Leslie Keros has plenty of blues from the Windy City in Episode 41 with sides by Jimmy Burns, Artie “Blues Boy” White, Howlin’ Wolf, Mighty Joe Young, A.C. Reed & The Spark Plugs, Willie Wright & His Sparklers, Earl Hooker, Andrew Brown, Big Joe Williams, Eddie Clearwater, Gloria Shannon, Eddie Boyd, Alfred “Blues King” Harris, The Aces, and Big Walter Horton.

BLUE SOUL

MESSIN’ WITH THE BLUES 40

Leslie Keros is paying homage to the late Orrin Keepnews, producer & writer for Riverside Records and other labels, here focusing on late ’50s/early ’60s Riverside cuts produced by Orrin on Eddie Lockjaw Davis & Johnny Griffin, Cannonball Adderley, Abbey Lincoln, Blue Mitchell, Kenny Dorham, Milt Jackson & Wes Montgomery, and Thelonious Monk.

Thursday, April 30

GIVE ME TIME

RED ROOSTER LOUNGE 145

Cary Wolfson is spinning at the Red Rooster Lounge with great blues sides by Rob Stone, Barbecue Bob, Blind Willie McTell, Mississippi Fred McDowell, Jimmy Reed, Chris James & Patrick Rynne, Rich Del Grosso & Jonn Del Toro Richardson, Billy Thompson, Roomful Of Blues, Buddy Guy, James Kinds, Shemekia Copeland, Candi Station, and Barry Levenson.

*

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Last Updated ( Wednesday, 01 April 2015 17:29 )
 
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